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The student news site of Kingwood Park High School

KP TIMES

The student news site of Kingwood Park High School

KP TIMES

Concert etiquette is crucial for quality experiences

Panchiko+performs+at+a+concert+at+the+House+of+Blues+in+Houston+on+Oct.+20%2C+2022.
Avery Steinke
Panchiko performs at a concert at the House of Blues in Houston on Oct. 20, 2022.

In the bleak years of the lockdown and pandemic, the future of live music was up in the air. Musicians and fans had no idea what concerts would be like or when they could start again.

It would take close to two years for concerts to look like they once had. And yet, there is still something about post-lockdown shows that just isn’t right. 

It came as no surprise that once live music made its comeback, everyone was determined to be there. The concert experience, that had once been taken for granted, was craved and in high demand. 

However, it has become increasingly evident that people simply don’t know how to behave at concerts anymore. 

Scrolling through social media, there is a new incident going viral almost daily of fans ruining the concert for those around them. Concert etiquette seems almost non-existent.

Artists put a lot of time and care into their craft for live performances. But now they are constantly met with low energy crowds. 

During the performances of opening artists, crowds have no shame in speaking over performers and even sitting during their sets. 

Even as the main performers come out, crowds look less interested in the electric atmosphere of live music and more interested in the quality of their cell phone recordings.

Phones not only distract the people holding them but also obstruct the view of people behind them. Other objects such as posters have also created a problem in standing crowds where there is a limited view of the stage. 

Large posters have become popular to hold up in hopes of recording a personal interaction with artists. But these signs often cover someone’s entire view of the action.

Many fans have also taken part in throwing things at artists to get their attention. This is incredibly dangerous and has resulted in serious injuries. Recently Bebe Rexha suffered an eye injury that required stitches after a fan threw a phone at her face.

No matter how much you paid for tickets, being a nuisance ruins the show for everyone around you. 

For example, screeching over an artist during every song is never acceptable but is no longer a rare occurrence. 

“Sing screaming” a portion of one song like the bridge of Taylor Swift’s “Cruel Summer” is normal and expected of Swifties. Having someone next to you yell every lyric at the top of their lungs for hours is outrageous. 

This behavior is not only inconsiderate but also incredibly annoying.

It all comes down to people’s sense of entitlement that their concert experience is what matters most. 

The solution to this surge in poor concert etiquette is simple. Be considerate for those around you and be open to learning norms that you may not be used to. 

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